Mohawk Hudson Chapter
Join AMC

What’s New at Mohawk Hudson AMC

Happy Spring!
Tulip Festival
Spring is time for cleaning, and our chapter has many projects planned to preserve and protect the outdoors. We will be doing trail work at several locations in the next few months, in local reservoirs, parks and preserves. The trail work is invigorating and rewarding. It also provides a chance to get to know like-minded people in a relaxed environment.

Besides trail work, we have other opportunities for community participation: we will have a table at the Tulip Festival on May 9 and 10, and we are also volunteering at the WAMC Fund Drive on June 2.

Check our calendar for details and signup information on both trail work and community participation, as well as outings.

Our social media presence continues to grow, with 133 “likes” on Facebook, and a following of 188 on Meetup. Check us out.


Support the Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), has provided an important source of support for conservation and recreation initiatives throughout the nation for many years. The LWCF provided funding for the initial extension of the Long Path trail north out of the Catskills, among many other conservation/recreation projects it has supported in New York State. Unfortunately, the fund expires this year, unless Congress re-appropriates it. AMC has urged supporters to join with it in signing a petition calling on Congress to reauthorize this fund. To lend your support, visit http://www.outdoors.org/conservation/issues, click on Take Action and Protect the Places to sign the petition.


AMC Fall Gathering, October 16 – 18, 2015

Lake George
Lake George From Black Mountain. Photo by C. Prewencki
Come enjoy the fall foliage and beautiful autumn scenery at AMC’s 2015 Fall Gathering on historic Lake George!
The 2015 Fall Gathering will be held October 16-18 and is being hosted by the Mohawk Hudson Chapter. Join AMC members from all chapters at Camp Chingachgook, nestled along the shore of gorgeous Lake George in the Adirondack Mountains.
All AMC members and their friends are invited to enjoy this fun annual event! Activities will include hikes to the numerous peaks that surround Lake George, cycling, and paddling (bring your own kayak). Friday and Saturday evenings feature pre-dinner social hours, live music and campfires.

Local History:
Lake George was an important passageway through the mountains and wilderness in the early history of the country. Fort William Henry, built by the British at the southern end of the lake, and Fort Ticonderoga, built by the French as Fort Carillon just north of the lake, were sites of major battles in the French & Indian Wars.
Lake George Battlefield Campground and Rogers Rock State Campground are on land for which Indians and colonists fought during the mid 18th century. James Fennimore Cooper set parts of The Last of the Mohicans at Fort William Henry in Lake George Village and Coopers Cave in nearby Glens Falls. Our camp is named after the Cooper hero, Chingachgook.

Artists Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe, and David Smith lived on the western shores during the summers in the 20th century. Georgia O’Keeffe stayed at the historic .Wiawaka Lodge, created in 1903 as a holiday home for the city of Troy NY’s mill girls. On this site, the Trask family founded an early version of the artist colony Yaddo, where O’Keefe was a young artist on scholarship before her more famous association with Alfred Stieglitz. Marcella Sembrich, late 19th to early 20th century opera star, had her summer home on the Lake, and in 1962 the Lake George Opera Festival was founded here. Now, Lake George is a major recreational area, drawing tourists to its scenic beauty from around the world.

Fall Gathering Website





Ticks and Lyme Disease


Lyme disease is on the rise in our area and early detection and treatment is the key to avoid serious complications. First it's important to thoroughly check for ticks, not only when you are outside but when you come in contact with a pet that has been outside. Lyme disease is caused by bacterium found in the stomachs of infected ticks and it may take as much as a day for the bacterium to make its way into your body. It's for this reason that the old tick removal method of covering a tick with oil or grease is not recommended as this can cause the tick to regurgitate the contents of its stomach into your bloodstream. The recommended method is to grasp the tick with a pair of tweezers as close to your skin as possible and steadily pull it away.

If you have been infected with Lyme disease it's important to get treated as soon as possible as serious complications can arise if left untreated. Unfortunately not everyone experiences the same symptoms and blood tests are slow and problematic. A "bull’s-eye" rash is often described as a symptom but the vision of multiple concentric rings this conjures is inaccurate. This type of rash just means that you will have an irregularly shaped red blotch but the center will be pale. This rash does not have to appear at all and may not appear at the site of the bite. Another type of rash that looks more like a bruise but will continue to increase in size and darkness can also occur. A fever may also occur and any fever lasting 5 days is generally reason to see a doctor, tick bite or not. Other symptoms may include fatigue, headaches, muscle and/or joint pain, or swollen lymph nodes.

Here is a document on Lyme disease from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and here is a document created by the Rensselaer County Department of Health hosted by the Rensselaer Land Trust.

Upcoming Events


04/25/2015
Tomhannock Reservoir Cleanup

04/26/2015
Dyken Pond Cleanup

05/02/2015
I Love My Park Day - Thacher

05/10/2015
Table at Tulip Festival

 

View Trip Activities
 
Read the latest issue of the newsletter
Read the latest newsletter
 
See What's New at amcmohawkhudson.org
 
For email updates about trip activities

 
Visit the Member Center to find out about discounts at Coleman Online Store
 
Find us on Facebook

Questions, Comments, Concerns? email the WebMaster
Site Map